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MUSIC FOR TRUMPET
Recommended methods and performance music for trumpet players of all levels.
BOOKS
About the lives of famous trumpet players and about trumpet playing.
TRUMPET RECORDINGS
Recommendations from an exciting collection of Great Trumpet Recordings
Summer Trumpet Courses

2014 SUMMER MUSIC PROGRAMS

LAFAYETTE SUMMER MUSIC JAZZ WORKSHOP

Small group jazz with leading jazz players and teachers. Focus on improvisation and small group ensemble.

http://lafayettejazz.wordpress.com

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY TRUMPET MASTER CLASSES

Ages: high school and college
Location: Evanston, IL
Website: http://www.scs.northwestern.edu/summernu/courses/?Department=MUSIC

PLENTY MORE COURSES LISTED HERE

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Adam Stinga / Roma Trumpet Virtuoso

EIGHT COUNTRIES, SIX LANGUAGES, TWO TRUMPET PLAYERS, ONE BAND

Paul Brody

Already in January of 2014 I break my New Year's resolution by checking emails while warming up on the trumpet. I open the latest mail at the top and work my way down the scales, playing a half step lower with each click. A young trumpeter who studied with me in Berlin writes, "Paul, H.N.Y. I saw you in the The Other Europeans documentary. That Moldavian gypsy trumpet player is amazing!" He includes the link to the trailer. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xuwoz42G0IU).

I wish him well, explain that the correct word for gypsy is Roma, and think about my colleague.

Last year Adam Stinga,

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ANCIENT TRUMPETS, REDISCOVERED RECORDING !

An astonishing rediscovered sound recording of ancient Egyptian trumpets, which were buried with King Tut 3000 year ago, is nothing short of fascinating. The musician chosen for this legendary broadcast was bandsman James Tappern........

GIVE A LISTEN !

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TRUMPETER'S ALAMANAC

dotztrpt

TRUMPETER'S ALMANAC

Two GIANTS of the Trumpet world celebrated their birthdays in December.

Timofei Dockshizer, the once preeminent Russian trumpet soloist and principal trumpet of the Bolshoi ballet dazzled the music world with his technical virtuosity and musicality. Through his efforts to put the trumpet on stage as an equal solo instrument with the violin he crafted many solo transcriptions, performed numerous solo concerts and made dozens of recordings. Dockshizer's approach was similar to Raphael Mendez’s efforts to have the trumpet recognized as a solo instrument worthy of the concert stage. Dockshizer is the trumpeter most associated with the Arutunian Trumpet concerto, a composition for which he wrote his well known cadenza.

Dokshizer was born in Nizhyn, Ukraine on Dec 13, 1921 and died on March 16, 2005. He started playing the trumpet at the age of ten and finished his studies at the Moscow Sate University in 1957. When asked about his trumpet study he said that he practiced not more than two and a half hours three times a day. On performance days he would practice from one half hour to not more than one hour.  He played mostly Bb trumpet with occasional use of the C as well as a piccolo.  His mouthpiece was a Bach 7e. Read Bruce Duffie’s 1995 interview with this master artist. http://www.bruceduffie.com/dok.html

 

Jazz giant Clark Terry celebrates his 83 birthday this December 14th. Its impossible to report here all of the achievements of Mr. Terry, a musician who has received sixteen honorary doctorates, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement award, the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master Award and the French Order of Arts and Letters award. Nothing beats listening to this creative jazz player. Musical integrity, humor and originality are the keystone to his music making. He has recorded on so many albums that it is impossible to get a measure of his achievement from one recording, but if you haven’t heard him before a good introduction might just be his recording with Oscar Peterson.

When asked about his early trumpet study Terry responded “never had a teacher, read a lot, studied a lot and pestered a lot of pros with 10,000 questions”.  It’s obviously clear that his study approach worked for him. Terry states that his main musical influences were from Louis Armstrong, Lester Young, Dizzy Gillespie and Ella Fitzgerald. When asked how long he practiced a day while a student he responded 4-5 hours and sometimes all day. On gig days he tried to get one hour in but when that was not possible he always got in at least a half hour a day. As a working musician, on free days, he would practice in 2-3 hours.

 

 
Include Scales in Your Daily Practice

PRACTICE A SCALE EVERYDAY until you have it mastered and memorized and can play it with a beautiful sound and steady time.  Which scale you might ask, practice one that you don’t know well. If you’re a beginner or in the early stages of playing pick the easiest one for you and work on it until you can play it with ease.  Practicing scales into your upper range is also a good technique for developing your high register. To develop your high notes you have to play in that range everyday, just don’t overdo it.  Try slurring or tonguing to your top notes. There are many kinds of scales to learn; major scales, minor scales as well as jazz scales, altered scale and scales from other cultures such as Indian Ragas. For advanced players it’s a must to learn to play them in different ways; slur, single tongue double tongue and triple tongue until it sounds clean and smooth. Using a metronome in your daily practice can be quite helpful for developing steady rhythm. Be creative, consistent and patient in your practice. Good practice always pays off!

Watch the great Rapahel Mendez demonstrate this with brillance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gUij8FCg0z8

 
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Trumpet Professor

Practice a scale everyday until you have it mastered and memorized and can play it with a beautiful sound and steady time.  Which scale you might ask, practice one that you don’t know well. If you’re a beginner or in the early stages of playing pick the easiest one for you and work on it until you can play it with ease.  Practicing scales into your upper range is also a good technique for developing your high register. To develop your high notes you have to play in that range everyday, just don’t overdo it.  Try slurring or tonguing to your top notes. There are many kinds of scales to learn; major scales, minor scales as well as jazz scales, altered scale and scales from other cultures such as Indian Ragas. For advanced players it’s a must to learn to play them in different ways; slur, single tongue double tongue and triple tongue until it sounds clean and smooth. Using a metronome in your daily practice can be quite helpful for developing steady rhythm. Be creative, consistent and patient in your practice. Good practice always pays off!

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